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WSJ: Why Likability Matters More at Work

We all know this – but did you know that you are judged differently in a video, than in person?

WSJ: 

Likable people are more apt to be hired, get help at work, get useful information from others and have mistakes forgiven. A study of 133 managers last year by researchers at the University of Massachusetts found that if an auditor is likable and gives a well-organized argument, managers tend to comply with his suggestions, even if they disagree and the auditor lacks supporting evidence.

Likability is more important—and harder to pull off—on video than in person. Sometimes this can result in a style-over-substance effect. People watching a speaker on a videoconference are more influenced by how much they like the speaker than by the quality of the speaker’s arguments, according to a 2008 study in Management Science. The opposite is true when a speaker appears in person. The use of personal videoconferencing is expected to grow 47% annually through 2017, according to Wainhouse Research, aBoston market-research firm.

 

Authenticity | To be more likable, behave in a way that feels natural and comfortable, rather than stiff or self-absorbed. Kyle T.Webster

Curiosity | Show interest in others, make eye contact and ask questions about others’ opinions and activities. Kyle T.Webster

Expressiveness | Vary tones of voice and smile, and show enthusiasm about what you’re saying—even more so in a videoconference. Kyle T.Webster

Listening | Focus on what others are saying and show that you are listening carefully, rather than getting distracted. Kyle T.Webster

Mimicry | Mirror the expressions or posture of the person you are talking to, in order to create a sense of familiarity. Kyle T.Webster

Similarity | Actively try to find topics of interest you share with a listener, rather than talking only about what interests you. Kyle T.Webster

Social networking also places a premium on likability. More employers track employees’ likability on in-house social networks and chat services. They recruit those who are trusted and well-liked to spread information or push through changes. Some companies take these employees’ social clout into account when handing out raises and promotions.

Listeners tend to like speakers who seem trustworthy and authentic, who tell an engaging or persuasive story and who seem to have things in common with them, says Noah Zandan, president ofQuantified Impressions in Austin, Texas, a provider of communications analytics. On video, these qualities can be hard to convey.

read the full article here:  http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303725404579461351615271292

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